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119 Marshall Avenue, Rutledge, Tennessee   (865) 828-5132
     
 
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VOTER REGISTRATION INFORMATION
IN PERSON - You may register to vote in person at the Election Commission office.  I.D with proof of residency in Grainger County is required before you can register. Registration is not transferable from county to county in Tennessee.  You must be 18 yrs. of age on or before the next election, a citizen of the United States, and must not have been convicted of a felony.  You DO NOT register in Tennessee by either Democrat or Republican.   Our office is located at:  119 Marshall Ave., Rutledge, TN in the old post office building.  Office hours are from 8:30 to 4:30 Monday - Friday.

NVRA AGENCIES
In Person registration is also available at these agencies:  Safety Dept., Health Dept., Dept. of Human Services.  Applications from these agencies will be mailed to our office for processing.  You are not a registered voter until you receive your card.

BY MAIL
Public libraries, high schools, office of County Clerk and Register of Deeds will have by-mail forms.   Our office supplies all post offices in our county with by–mail forms, with the exception of Rutledge, since our office is close by.  You can print a by-mail form from the state web-site at the following address:  www.state.tn.us/sos/election.  A person who registers by-mail must vote in person the first time you vote.   Check your voter registration status and polling place information .  Click here

OVRON-LINE - As of September 6, 2017, Tennessee now offers On-Line Voter Rergistration.  Please go to GoVoteTN.com
and follow the directions.  Voter Registration Deadlines are the same with On-Line Registration as with mail-in or in-person registration. 

FEDERAL POST CARD APPLICATIONS (STANDARD FORM 76)
This form is used by Uniformed Services Voters, U.S. Citizen temporarily residing outside the U.S, or an eligible spouse or dependent. The form serves as an application for temporary registration, if they are not currently registered, and an application for an absentee ballot.
PRINT FORM 76 

FILLING OUT THE REGISTRATION FORM
– Please read the instructions on the form before you start. Print with either a blue or black pen (not felt tip), provide information on items 1-8, and read the voter declaration carefully.  Please don’t forget to put a check mark or an X after each question on the yes and no columns.  This is a common mistake that people make and the result is a delay in processing the application.   Sign your name on the signature line.  If a person is unable to sign his/her name, then the signature of person assisting must sign.

FILING A TIMELY REGISTRATION APPLICATION
- Before any election there is deadline in which you must apply in person or by-mail to register.  Applications will not be processed for (29) days before the election.  A qualified voter may file a mail registration form by postmarking the registration form or submitting the form (30) days before an election.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS OR NAME
- It is important to keep your address information current. Your address determines what precinct you will vote in. You may come to our office and update in person, or you may complete a by-mail form and mail to us, or you can simply send in your old voter’s card with the information filled out on the back of the card with your signature.  We need your signature to make any change on your registration, so requesting a change on the phone is not an option. If you wait until Election Day to update, you will need to complete additional paperwork before you can vote, and depending on your address, you may be sent to a different precinct to vote in. 

PURGING  -  You are considered a permanent registered voter and will not be purged
unless:
  •   at the request of the voter in writing;
  •   90 days after a change of name for any reason, except by marriage;
  •   the voter dies;
  •   upon receiving information a voter has been convicted of a felony;
  •   has registered in another county or state;
  •   has been on inactive for a period of two (2) November elections since a Confirmation Notice was sent.

PRIMARY ELECTION PROCEDURES  

Many questions are asked by the voters during the primary election process. What is a primary?  Why do we have them?  Why do we have to choose?  Explanation below:  

WHAT IS A PRIMARY
- Primary is an election held for a political party for the purpose of allowing members of that party to select a nominee or nominees to appear on the general election ballot.  The winners in each primary will be on the general ballot along with any independent candidates that have qualified for the election. 

WHY DO WE HAVE THEM - Some offices are mandatory.  The call for a primary has been established by the general law and must be held at the time required by the law.  They are:
  •   U.S. President/Delegate Candidate;
  •   Governor;
  •   Tennessee Senate;
  •   Tennessee House of Representatives;
  •   U.S. Senate;
  •   U.S. House of Representatives
OPTIONAL OFFICES - All county offices. (excluding school board members)  If a primary is to be held for a county office, then we must receive from the county chairman of the political party a letter requesting the Election Commission to hold the primary.  Municipal elections are also exempt from partisan elections unless their charter permits.

WHY DO WE HAVE TO CHOOSE
You can’t vote in two (primary elections) on the same day.  Obviously, you must mark the primary you wish to vote in on the application, or the machine operator would not know how to set the machine for you to vote.  If you object to choosing a primary, then you should wait until the general election to vote.  Hopefully, your candidate won the primary and would still be on the ballot.